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Rites of Passage

Rites of Passage

In the early 1800s, Edmund Talbot, a young and rather priggish Englishman, takes passage on a boat heading for Australia where he is to be an official in the colonial government. In addition to Talbot, many of the eccentric passengers—a sexually predatory sailor, the aging coquette Miss Zenobia Brocklebank, the ship’s tyrannical captain—undergo profound changes in the course of the voyage, during which a naive clergyman is victimised and, finally, pushed to suicide.

 

About the Author

William Golding

William Golding was born in Cornwall in 1911. During World War II, Golding served in the Royal Navy in command of a rocket ship. In 1939 he moved to Salisbury, where he began teaching English and philosophy. Lord of the Flies, his first novel, was published in 1954. It was filmed by Peter Brook in 1963. In 1980 he won the Booker Prize for his novel Rites of Passage. He retired from teaching in 1962. After that, he lived in Wiltshire, listing his recreations as music, sailing, archaeology and classical Greek. William Golding died in 1993.

Image of William Golding